Friday, April 8, 2011

beeswax egg candle tutorial!

today i will share with you how to make this sweet smelling egg candle!
you will need:
eggs that have been blown out (tutorial at magic onions)
beeswax
wick (i used braided for 2-3" candles)
a long needle or a piece of thin, bendable wire
a small bit of clay
scissors
*melt your beeswax in a bain marie. this is what my set up looks like. i use an aluminum percolator that i found at the thrift shop for $1. the pan is from the thrift store, too. i use beeswax often and these two items live in a box of my beeswax supplies.
*thread your wick through your blown out eggshell. i used a needle to get it through the holes. you could also use a piece of thin, folded wire to thread it through. you want a bit of wick sticking out both ends.
*on the small end of your egg, cover the hole and the wick with clay. keeping your clay very moist will make this step much easier. you can use a little water to smooth out the edges and to ensure you have a good seal.
*place egg in carton with clay side down. i doubled my cartons while working to help soak up any wax spills.
*once your wax is melted, pour it into your egg.
*beeswax shrinks as it cools so you will need to top it off. you could tie your wick around a toothpick or something to hold it in place. i just adjusted mine as the wax began to harden and it worked out fine.
*allow your egg to cool for a considerable time. we left the house to run some errands while ours cooled. then, gently crack it open and begin to peel your shell away. note: if you smash your egg on the counter to break the shell, you will damage the beeswax inside!
most of the wax had shrunk and separated nicely from the shell making the task of peeling rather painless. we did have this problem spot where the shell stuck to the wax. we just kept picking away at it until we removed all of the shell. we were then able to wash off the white residue with soap and water.
*trim your wicks and find a stand for your bee-utiful egg!
notes and variations:

*you can use a blow dryer to warm your egg up and then smooth out any surface scratches or smudges.

*if you do not have a stand, you could make a flat bottom for your egg to sit on by touching the wide end of your egg to a warm pot on the stove. this will melt the wax down just a bit and give you a nice flat surface.

*the wooden stand above was bought at the craft store in the unfinished wood section.

*peel only half of the shell off for a fun, just cracked looked!

*decorate your finished egg with decorating or modeling beeswax.

have fun!!

13 comments:

  1. Love reading your posts.

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  2. You have the best ideas, I am definately making egg candles this year. I follow you as Kathy B. Please come and visit my blog if you like it join. http://www.southernmadeintheshade.blogspot.com
    I am a suburb girl missing my old country life, in my mind I am already back in the Country.

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  3. This is such a lovely idea! Thank you so much for the tutorial; will definitely make these for Easter :)

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  4. Thank you so much for this lovely idea! My children and I will be doing this today! Blessings to you and your wee ones...

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  5. I was thinking of doing this, as we have a stash of egg shells collected throughout the year and a stash of wax left from my days B.C. (before children) in several colors. Not beeswax, but it still burns. I'm glad to know it can be done and to have your tips.

    Our other use for empty egg shells is to make Jello eggs, using 2 extra packets of plain gelatin with the flavored Jello. As with wax, if you have multiple colors, you can make striped eggs by pouring a little, letting it set and then pouring another color.

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  6. color your wick first, with dye.... ( yellow ! ) and it appears that the yolk is inside... when you burn them....
    Cracked eggshells are great to glue to old wooden boxes, and then shelac them over so it appears antique ! very cool ! try it
    MS

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    Replies
    1. If you are having drainage problems, it may be from high clay content in your soil and/or a grading problem or something else entirely.
      I suggest contacting some local contractors for their take on the cause and possible remedies of your puddles.
      Many contractors will give you a free courtesy evaluation. The method I discuss above might not work to prevent your puddles if you have very high clay soil that is near the surface and goes deep into your soil.
      Also, if your landscaping is poorly graded, then regrading it may be your best option.


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      Delete
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